Looking for a tittle.

Do not worry, I will find one.


Ask me anything  


Reblogged from visualizingmath
visualizingmath:

Taylor Series
In mathematics, a Taylor series is a representation of a function as an infinite sum of terms that are calculated from the values of the function’s derivatives at a single point. 
It is common practice to approximate a function by using a finite number of terms of its Taylor series. Taylor’s theorem gives quantitative estimates on the error in this approximation. Any finite number of initial terms of the Taylor series of a function is called a Taylor polynomial. The Taylor series of a function is the limit of that function’s Taylor polynomials, provided that the limit exists. A function may not be equal to its Taylor series, even if its Taylor series converges at every point. A function that is equal to its Taylor series in an open interval (or a disc in the complex plane) is known as an analytic function. Source.
 I’ve never heard of this, and I don’t completely understand it, but it’s interesting! Above: A Taylor approximation of the function sin(x). Image source.

visualizingmath:

Taylor Series

In mathematics, a Taylor series is a representation of a function as an infinite sum of terms that are calculated from the values of the function’s derivatives at a single point. 

It is common practice to approximate a function by using a finite number of terms of its Taylor series. Taylor’s theorem gives quantitative estimates on the error in this approximation. Any finite number of initial terms of the Taylor series of a function is called a Taylor polynomial. The Taylor series of a function is the limit of that function’s Taylor polynomials, provided that the limit exists. A function may not be equal to its Taylor series, even if its Taylor series converges at every point. A function that is equal to its Taylor series in an open interval (or a disc in the complex plane) is known as an analytic function. Source.

I’ve never heard of this, and I don’t completely understand it, but it’s interesting! Above: A Taylor approximation of the function sin(x). Image source.

Reblogged from armix
I think a person needs to learn from childhood to find himself alone. It means to not be bored when you’re by yourself, because a person who finds himself bored when alone –as it seems to me– is in danger. Andrei Tarkovsky - A Poet in the Cinema (via armix)

(via fuckyeahexistentialism)

Reblogged from awritersruminations

awritersruminations:

I am not good. I am not virtuous. I am not sympathetic. I am not generous. I am merely and above all a creature of intense passionate feeling. I feel—everything. It is my genius. It burns me like fire.

—Mary MacLane, I Await The Devil’s Coming

Reblogged from q-bit
jtotheizzoe:

via q-bit:

Fabrycky explains in a description of the video on YouTube, the animation shows the “relative sizes of the orbits and planets in the multi-transiting planetary systems discovered by Kepler up to Nov. 2013.”

This GIF is kinda stressing me out. These exoplanets … they’re so intense, so hyperactive, so orbitally manic!
If this is too much for you, then check out The New York Times’ animated Kepler tally. It’s much more Zen … much more calming.
Finally, when you’re done tallying the Milky Way’s confirmed exoplanets, a drop in the bucket of the perhaps hundred of billions of other worlds out there, watch my video all about searching for other Earths!

jtotheizzoe:

via q-bit:

Fabrycky explains in a description of the video on YouTube, the animation shows the “relative sizes of the orbits and planets in the multi-transiting planetary systems discovered by Kepler up to Nov. 2013.”

This GIF is kinda stressing me out. These exoplanets … they’re so intense, so hyperactive, so orbitally manic!

If this is too much for you, then check out The New York Times’ animated Kepler tally. It’s much more Zen … much more calming.

Finally, when you’re done tallying the Milky Way’s confirmed exoplanets, a drop in the bucket of the perhaps hundred of billions of other worlds out there, watch my video all about searching for other Earths!

Reblogged from sciencesoup
sciencesoup:


Seeing Sound
Dolphins and bats are separated by a few million years of evolution, but they do share an interesting sensory talent: echolocation, the process of “seeing” the world through sound. An animal will emit pulses of high-pitched sound, and the echo that returns can tell the animal about the distance, shape, texture and speed of objects around them, giving them a three-dimensional view of their world—just like sonar used by ships and submarines. Horseshoe bats emit these pulses through specialised nasal structures called nose leafs, and they have especially large ears that can detect the faintest echoes. Bottlenose dolphins and other toothed whales, like killer whales, produce sound by moving air through sinuses in their head, and the echoes are received by their lower jaw and transmitted through sound-conducting tissue to their brain. Researchers at the Queen Mary University of London have shown that echolocation developed independently but parallel in both bats and toothed whales, thanks to the same genetic mutation. In the study, nearly 200 genetic regions in both groups of animals were found to have evolved in the same way. This is interesting because it suggests that “convergent evolution” is pretty common—the process by which very different animals acquire the same traits. Bats, insects and birds, for example, all independently developed similar-shaped wings. Clearly, bats and toothed whales have both developed echolocation as a specialised hunting strategy, and further research will tell us if that’s all they have in common. The research was published in Nature.

sciencesoup:

Seeing Sound

Dolphins and bats are separated by a few million years of evolution, but they do share an interesting sensory talent: echolocation, the process of “seeing” the world through sound. An animal will emit pulses of high-pitched sound, and the echo that returns can tell the animal about the distance, shape, texture and speed of objects around them, giving them a three-dimensional view of their world—just like sonar used by ships and submarines. Horseshoe bats emit these pulses through specialised nasal structures called nose leafs, and they have especially large ears that can detect the faintest echoes. Bottlenose dolphins and other toothed whales, like killer whales, produce sound by moving air through sinuses in their head, and the echoes are received by their lower jaw and transmitted through sound-conducting tissue to their brain. Researchers at the Queen Mary University of London have shown that echolocation developed independently but parallel in both bats and toothed whales, thanks to the same genetic mutation. In the study, nearly 200 genetic regions in both groups of animals were found to have evolved in the same way. This is interesting because it suggests that “convergent evolution” is pretty common—the process by which very different animals acquire the same traits. Bats, insects and birds, for example, all independently developed similar-shaped wings. Clearly, bats and toothed whales have both developed echolocation as a specialised hunting strategy, and further research will tell us if that’s all they have in common. The research was published in Nature.

Reblogged from wildcat2030
Reblogged from newyorker
newyorker:

A cartoon by Zachary Kanin. For more cartoons from this week’s issue: http://nyr.kr/1gBSFRi

newyorker:

A cartoon by Zachary Kanin. For more cartoons from this week’s issue: http://nyr.kr/1gBSFRi

Reblogged from psicologicamenteblog
Why should society feel responsible only for the education of children, and not for the education of all adults of every age? Eric Fromm (via psicologicamenteblog)

(via wildcat2030)